Pumps

PlumbNation Macerator & Pump Guide

Whether it’s a domestic household property or an industrial / commercial business premises you may find you will need a water pump to boost water pressure if the existing mains water supply cannot sufficiently cope with the necessary household water demands. If you are looking to add an en suite bathroom to your home then you are most likely to need a macerator pump. Shower booster pumps are available to literally boost water pressure and increase flow rates to your shower.

Domestic Heating Pump

A Central Heating Pump (also referred to as a Domestic Water Pump or Circulator Water Pump) is designed for circulating water in open and closed heating and domestic water systems. Central Heating Pumps are powered by electricity, and they work in conjunction with the boiler, zone valves and thermostats to provide heat for your home. When the thermostat indicates that heat is required, the zone valve is opened, the Central Heating Pump is activated and hot water is circulated through the hot water heating system. As the water cools the boiler turns on and reheats the water in the closed loop hot water heating system.

The performance of a Central Heating Pump or Circulator Water Pump is measured by its flow performance. The flow performance is a function of the flow-rate (number of gallons / litres of water that can be pushed through the system per minute), and the head pressure of the Domestic Water Pump.

The head pressure rating of a Central Heating Pump is the maximum vertical height the pump can lift the water. Consequently if you have a large hot water system design that needs to go up two floor levels (e.g. from the basement to the second floor of a home) you will need a Circulator Pump that can support a higher flow performance with a high head pressure.

Hot Water Service Pump

Besides being used for home heating systems, a Water Pump is also frequently used for supplying on-demand hot water for the domestic hot water needs of the household. The Water Pump continuously provides hot water through the home hot water supply pipes, so that when a hot water tap is turned on, hot water is available immediately. The advantage of this is that you won't waste water, but the disadvantage is that you may waste energy by constantly heating water if it is rarely used.

Commercial Pump

A Commercial Pump works exactly like an everyday domestic circulator pump (designed for circulating water around either a heating or domestic hot water system) except that a commercial pump has to circulate fluids around a larger sized commercial building, hence its duties to be that little bit more demanding.

There is a wide range of commercial pumps available, each pump capable of different duties. One of the main criteria with selecting a commercial pump is ensuring the pump has the capability of performing the required duty, which means the correct flow rate (typically Litres/Sec) and resistance (typically Kpa).

Smaller Light Commercial circulators are supplied with screwed union ends, whilst the Larger Commercial circulators are supplied flanged as standard. Normal practice for all pumps is to fit isolating valves either side of the pump for maintenance purposes.

Shower Pump

Shower Pumps, are generally required if you already have a mixer shower and are experiencing flow problems due to low pressure in the supply pipe work. A pump can be installed to increase the pressure of stored hot and cold water, not from mains-fed water. For example, Shower Pumps & Pumped Power Showers cannot be used if you have a Combi Boiler or an Unvented Cylinder.

Shower Pumps are available with Single Impellers and Twin Impellers. Impellers are the Inlet and Outlet pipes attached to the pump. If you are looking to boost your hot water supply then a single impeller pump would be required, if however, you wish to boost both your hot and cold water supply, then you would need to install a twin impeller Booster Pump.

Macerator Pump

A typical household tends to have only one bathroom / toilet that has just one soil pipe to take the waste away and that is usually at the back of the house. If you are looking to install an en suite bathroom, a shower in a new loft extension, or a downstairs toilet under the stairs, but don’t have direct access to the conventional drainage system, then a Macerator Pumping system offers the ideal solution.

Conventional plumbing takes the waste away from the toilet through gravity fed 100mm pipework to the soil pipe, whereas with a Macerator Pump, waste and water is pumped away from the unit through a 22 or 32mm pipework to a soil stack. This is commonly referred to as Small Bore pumping system. Macerators can also pump upwards, meaning pipework is unobtrusive, and can run almost anywhere, such as underfloor boards or through loft space, giving you maximum flexibility.

Condensate Pump

Mostly used with high efficiency boilers, Condensate Pumps are used to collect and transport condensate back into a steam system for reheating and reuse, or to remove unwanted condensate altogether. A condensate pipe line is usually installed to carry away condensate, however this is not possible when the unit in question is below ground level, and therefore a Condensate Pump must be installed, in order for the condensate to be removed.

As well as use with Condensing Boilers, Condensate Pumps are often used for in conjunction with other water producing equipment such as air conditioners, dehumidifiers etc.

Home Booster Pump

There are two types of Home Booster Pumps – a small stand-alone water pump, and an all-in-one storage unit & water pump.

The small stand-alone pump is only suitable for use with conventional open vented heating systems. It uses the stored water within the heating system to supply your hot taps and shower with an extra boost of hot water. These are not suitable for use with a Combi Boiler or an Unvented Cylinder.

The all-in-one storage unit collects and stores water from the mains water supply then pumps it throughout the property to provide a water boost to Taps and Showers.

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